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(Canon and continuity)
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{{fanfic-info
 
{{fanfic-info
 
| name = Star Trek: Pendragon
 
| name = Star Trek: Pendragon
| image = [[Image:PDN Logo1a.jpg]]
+
| image = PDN Logo1a.jpg
 
| author = [[User:TimPendragon|T.L. Morgan]]
 
| author = [[User:TimPendragon|T.L. Morgan]]
 
| format = Prose
 
| format = Prose
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==Background information==
 
==Background information==
The "[[Pendragon timeline|Pendragon universe]]" branched off from the main timeline in [[2372]] when Admiral [[James Leyton|James Leyton's]] coup on Earth was successful, sparking a conflict commonly known as the [[Federation Civil War]] from mid-2372 to early [[2374]].
+
The "[[Pendragon timeline|Pendragon universe]]" branched off from the main timeline in [[2372]] when Admiral [[James Leyton|James Leyton's]] [[coup]] on Earth was successful, sparking a conflict commonly known as the [[Federation Civil War]] from mid-2372 to early [[2374]].
   
The main portion of the series takes place five years after the Civil War, beginning in January [[2379]] and running for seven seasons until the end of [[2385]], featuring the crew of the [[USS Pendragon|USS ''Pendragon'']]. Certain episodes contain flashbacks to the Civil War-era or earlier, and some are "times past" tales (eg, from a characters's days at [[Starfleet Academy]]).
+
The main portion of the series takes place five years after the Civil War, beginning in January [[2379]] and running for seven seasons until the end of [[2385]], featuring the crew of the {{uss|Pendragon}}. Certain episodes contain flashbacks to the Civil War-era or earlier, and some are "times past" tales (eg, from a character's days at [[Starfleet Academy]]).
   
 
Images of actors are used in photomanipulations to simulate the "cast" of the series.
 
Images of actors are used in photomanipulations to simulate the "cast" of the series.
   
 
==Canon and continuity==
 
==Canon and continuity==
''Star Trek: Pendragon'' accepts as canon those productions which [[memoryalpha:Paramount Pictures|Paramount Pictures]] accept, meaning the original ''Star Trek'', its live action spinoffs, and the ten motion pictures. Additionally, the ''Pendragon'' staff accept the animated ''Star Trek'' series as canon, as well as numerous novels, comics and other material.
+
''Star Trek: Pendragon'' accepts as canon those productions which {{ma|Paramount Pictures}} accept, meaning the original ''Star Trek'', its live action spinoffs, and the ten motion pictures. Additionally, the ''Pendragon'' staff accept the animated ''Star Trek'' series as canon, as well as numerous novels, comics and other material.
   
A notable exception is the series ''[[memoryalpha:Star Trek: Enterprise|Star Trek: Enterprise]]''. Because of its blatant disregard for established ''Trek'' canon and convention, the ''Pendragon'' staff had decided to either ignore the series, or retcon certain aspects of it to fit with previous information. However, once the ''Enterprise'''s fourth season began and [[memoryalpha:Manny Coto|Manny Coto]] became the showrunner, the writing improved dramatically, and canon was respected again. In consequence, the Coto-era ''Enterprise'' episodes are accepted as canon, and the problems of the previous three seasons are assumed to result from the changes of the [[Temporal Cold War]]. In the "corrected timeline," ''Pendragon'' assumes, things were different. The notable exception to this rule is the episode "These Are the Voyages," which hearkened back to the pre-Coto era. The canonicity of this episode remains to be determined.
+
A notable exception is the series ''{{ma|Star Trek: Enterprise}}''. Because of what the authors considered its "blatant disregard for established ''Trek'' canon and convention," the ''Pendragon'' staff had decided to either ignore the series, or retcon certain aspects of it to fit with previous information. However, once the ''Enterprise'''s fourth season began and [[memoryalpha:Manny Coto|Manny Coto]] became the showrunner, the writing improved dramatically, and canon was respected again. In consequence, the Coto-era ''Enterprise'' episodes are accepted as canon, and the problems of the previous three seasons are assumed to result from the changes of the [[Temporal Cold War]]. In the "corrected timeline," ''Pendragon'' assumes, things were different. The notable exception to this rule is the episode "These Are the Voyages," which hearkened back to the pre-Coto era. The canonicity of the episode itself is questionable, and ''Pendragon'' follows the Pocket Books' ''Enterprise'' Relaunch novels continuity in this regard.
   
Additionally, events and information presented in several novels published by [[startrekwiki:Pocket Books|Pocket Books]] are considered "canonical" for ''Pendragon'', either in whole or in part. These include:
+
Additionally, events and information presented in several novels published by {{mb|Pocket Books}} are considered "canonical" for ''Pendragon'', either in whole or in part. These include:
*''[[startrekwiki:Final Frontier|Final Frontier]]'' and ''[[startrekwiki:Best Destiny|Best Destiny]]'' by [[startrekwiki:Diane Carey|Diane Carey]]
+
*''{{mb|Final Frontier}}'' and ''{{mb|Best Destiny}}'' by {{mb|Diane Carey}}
*''[[startrekwiki:Rihannsu: The Bloodwing Voyages|The Rihannsu Saga]]'' by [[startrekwiki:Diane Duane|Diane Duane]]
+
*''{{mb|Rihannsu: The Bloodwing Voyages|The Rihannsu Saga}}'' by {{mb|Diane Duane}}
*''[[startrekwiki:The Ashes of Eden|The Ashes of Eden]]'', ''[[startrekwiki:The Return (novel)|The Return]]'', ''[[startrekwiki:Avenger|Avenger]]'' and ''[[startrekwiki:Spectre|Spectre]]'' by [[startrekwiki:William Shatner|William Shatner]] and [[startrekwiki:Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens|Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens]]
+
*''{{mb|The Ashes of Eden}}'', ''{{mb|The Return (novel)|The Return}}'', ''{{mb|Avenger}}'' and ''{{mb|Spectre|Spectre}}'' by {{mb|William Shatner}} and {{mb|Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens}}
*''[[startrekwiki:Vulcan's Forge (novel)|Vulcan's Forge]]'', ''[[startrekwiki:Vulcan's Heart|Vulcan's Heart]]'', and the ''[[startrekwiki:Vulcan's Soul|Vulcan's Soul]]'' trilogy by [[startrekwiki:Josepha Sherman|Josepha Sherman]] and [[startrekwiki:Susan Schwartz|Susan Schwartz]]
+
*''{{mb|Vulcan's Forge (novel)|Vulcan's Forge}}'', ''{{mb|Vulcan's Heart}}'', and the ''{{mb|Vulcan's Soul}}'' trilogy by {{mb|Josepha Sherman}} and {{mb|Susan Schwartz}}
*''[[startrekwiki:Sarek (novel)|Sarek]]'' by [[startrekwiki:A.C. Crispin|A.C. Crispin]]
+
*''{{mb|Sarek (novel)|Sarek}}'' by {{mb|A.C. Crispin}}
*''[[startrekwiki:The Lost Years|The Lost Years]]'' by [[startrekwiki:J.M. Dillard|J.M. Dillard]]
+
*''{{mb|The Lost Years}}'' by {{mb|J.M. Dillard|J.M. Dillard}}
   
Elements of other novels and even comic books are also incorporated into the background of ''Pendragon'', in order to provide a richer tapestry. These include the characters of [[Elias Vaughn]], [[Mackenzie Calhoun]], and [[Matthew Decker]] among others.
+
Elements of other novels and even comic books are also incorporated into the background of ''Pendragon'', in order to provide a richer tapestry. These include the characters of [[Elias Vaughn]], [[Mackenzie Calhoun]], and [[Matthew Decker (24th century)|Matt Decker]], among others.
   
 
Various computer and roleplaying games also play a part in ''Pendragon'' canon, notably the ''Starfleet Academy'' and ''Star Trek: Borg'' PC games, and the RPG materials produced by [[Last Unicorn Games]] and [[Decipher, Inc.]].
 
Various computer and roleplaying games also play a part in ''Pendragon'' canon, notably the ''Starfleet Academy'' and ''Star Trek: Borg'' PC games, and the RPG materials produced by [[Last Unicorn Games]] and [[Decipher, Inc.]].
   
There are parts of ''Pendragon'' background that are drawn piecemeal from different sources. For example, [[Romulan]] culture is drawn primarily from Diane Duane's ''Rihannsu'' novels, but also from LUG's ''The Way of D'era'' sourcebook. When background for something in Pendragon is created using this "patchwork-quilt" method, often times elements of one source are ignored or altered in favor of preferable, more logical, weighty or "authoritative" elements from another source.
+
There are parts of ''Pendragon'' background that are drawn piecemeal from different sources. For example, [[Romulan]] culture is drawn primarily from Diane Duane's ''Rihannsu'' novels, but also from LUG's ''The Way of D'era'' sourcebook. When background for something in ''Pendragon'' is created using this "patchwork-quilt" method, often times elements of one source are ignored or altered in favor of preferable, more logical, weighty or "authoritative" elements from another source.
   
 
All these things make up '''Pendragon continuity''', the definition of what fits and what does not within ''Star Trek: Pendragon''. However, ''Pendragon'' continuity can be broken down into two separate divisions: the "mainstream universe" where canon ''Trek'' takes place, and the [[Pendragon timeline|''Pendragon'' timeline]] itself, where the primary action of the series is set.
 
All these things make up '''Pendragon continuity''', the definition of what fits and what does not within ''Star Trek: Pendragon''. However, ''Pendragon'' continuity can be broken down into two separate divisions: the "mainstream universe" where canon ''Trek'' takes place, and the [[Pendragon timeline|''Pendragon'' timeline]] itself, where the primary action of the series is set.
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*Doctor [[Ashley Bulala]]
 
*Doctor [[Ashley Bulala]]
 
:Chief medical officer. ''Played by Sasha Alexander.'' (Season 3-)
 
:Chief medical officer. ''Played by Sasha Alexander.'' (Season 3-)
  +
*[[Lieutenant]] [[Kiley Thoren]]
  +
:Ship's counselor. ''Played by Jill Hennessy.'' (Seasons 1-3)
   
 
'''Seasons 4-7'''
 
'''Seasons 4-7'''
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*Doctor [[Ashley Bulala]]
 
*Doctor [[Ashley Bulala]]
 
:Chief medical officer. ''Played by Sasha Alexander.''
 
:Chief medical officer. ''Played by Sasha Alexander.''
  +
*[[Lieutenant junior grade|Lieutenant j.g.]] [[Sarah Higgins]]
  +
:Ship's counselor. ''Played by Tempestt Bledsoe''.
 
*[[Lieutenant junior grade|Lieutenant j.g.]] [[Jason Bartholomew]]
 
*[[Lieutenant junior grade|Lieutenant j.g.]] [[Jason Bartholomew]]
 
:Helmsman. ''Played by Rick Schroder.'' (Seasons 4-5)
 
:Helmsman. ''Played by Rick Schroder.'' (Seasons 4-5)
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==Episodes==
 
==Episodes==
 
===Season One===
 
===Season One===
*"[[True North (PDN episode)|True North]]" (Pilot)
+
*"[[True North (PDN episode)|True North]]"
 
*"[[Restoration (PDN episode)|Restoration]]"
 
*"[[Restoration (PDN episode)|Restoration]]"
 
*"[[Exile (PDN episode)|Exile]]"
 
*"[[Exile (PDN episode)|Exile]]"
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*"Wounded Soldiers"
 
*"Wounded Soldiers"
 
*"Obsidian Shadow"
 
*"Obsidian Shadow"
*"[[Dark Helix (PDN episode)|Dark Helix]]"
+
*"Dark Helix"
 
*"Sword of Damocles" (Part I)
 
*"Sword of Damocles" (Part I)
 
*"Sword of Damocles" (Part II)
 
*"Sword of Damocles" (Part II)
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*"Hidden Agendas"
 
*"Hidden Agendas"
 
*"Practice in Waking"
 
*"Practice in Waking"
*"[[Heritage (PDN episode)|Heritage]]"
+
*"Heritage"
 
*"The Forgeman"
 
*"The Forgeman"
 
*"Children of the Burning Heart"
 
*"Children of the Burning Heart"
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*"The Kraken"
 
*"The Kraken"
 
*"Ruling from the Tomb"
 
*"Ruling from the Tomb"
*"Hour of the Wolf"
+
*"An Hour of Wolves"
 
*"Odyssey, Part I"
 
*"Odyssey, Part I"
 
*"Odyssey, Part II"
 
*"Odyssey, Part II"
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*"Dragonslayer"
 
*"Dragonslayer"
 
*"The Way to Camlann"
 
*"The Way to Camlann"
  +
 
===Season Seven===
 
===Season Seven===
 
*"Camelot's Ashes"
 
*"Camelot's Ashes"
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**"Dark Paradigm"
 
**"Dark Paradigm"
 
**"'Til We Have Built Camelot"
 
**"'Til We Have Built Camelot"
*''Other Knights'' (anthology, edited by T.L. Morgan)
+
*''[[Other Knights]]'' (anthology, edited by T.L. Morgan)
 
*''Once and Future'' (anthology)
 
*''Once and Future'' (anthology)
 
**"The Fisher King"
 
**"The Fisher King"
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==External links==
 
==External links==
*Official website coming soon
 
 
*[http://www.twguild.com/archive/truenorth-ss-pen.html ''True North''], an early draft of the pilot episode at [http://www.twguild.com The Trek Writer's Guild].
 
*[http://www.twguild.com/archive/truenorth-ss-pen.html ''True North''], an early draft of the pilot episode at [http://www.twguild.com The Trek Writer's Guild].
+
*[http://timpendragon.livejournal.com/3394.html "Lasting Virtue"], drabble at the author's LiveJournal
 
[[Category:Fan fiction|Pendragon]]
 
[[Category:Fan fiction|Pendragon]]
[[Category:Fan series|Pendragon]]
 
 
[[Category:Star Trek: Pendragon| ]]
 
[[Category:Star Trek: Pendragon| ]]
[[Category:Sourced|Pendragon]]
 

Revision as of 23:59, February 24, 2013

Star Trek: Pendragon is a fan fiction series written (primarily) by T.L. Morgan. It was originally conceived in 1999, and has undergone a long process of development.

The series is an "alternate history," and primarily takes place in a divergent timeline from the main Star Trek universe. Events are the same until the Deep Space Nine episode "Homefront" but diverge afterwards.

Background information

The "Pendragon universe" branched off from the main timeline in 2372 when Admiral James Leyton's coup on Earth was successful, sparking a conflict commonly known as the Federation Civil War from mid-2372 to early 2374.

The main portion of the series takes place five years after the Civil War, beginning in January 2379 and running for seven seasons until the end of 2385, featuring the crew of the USS Pendragon. Certain episodes contain flashbacks to the Civil War-era or earlier, and some are "times past" tales (eg, from a character's days at Starfleet Academy).

Images of actors are used in photomanipulations to simulate the "cast" of the series.

Canon and continuity

Star Trek: Pendragon accepts as canon those productions which Paramount Pictures accept, meaning the original Star Trek, its live action spinoffs, and the ten motion pictures. Additionally, the Pendragon staff accept the animated Star Trek series as canon, as well as numerous novels, comics and other material.

A notable exception is the series Star Trek: Enterprise. Because of what the authors considered its "blatant disregard for established Trek canon and convention," the Pendragon staff had decided to either ignore the series, or retcon certain aspects of it to fit with previous information. However, once the Enterprise's fourth season began and Manny Coto became the showrunner, the writing improved dramatically, and canon was respected again. In consequence, the Coto-era Enterprise episodes are accepted as canon, and the problems of the previous three seasons are assumed to result from the changes of the Temporal Cold War. In the "corrected timeline," Pendragon assumes, things were different. The notable exception to this rule is the episode "These Are the Voyages," which hearkened back to the pre-Coto era. The canonicity of the episode itself is questionable, and Pendragon follows the Pocket Books' Enterprise Relaunch novels continuity in this regard.

Additionally, events and information presented in several novels published by Pocket Books are considered "canonical" for Pendragon, either in whole or in part. These include:

Elements of other novels and even comic books are also incorporated into the background of Pendragon, in order to provide a richer tapestry. These include the characters of Elias Vaughn, Mackenzie Calhoun, and Matt Decker, among others.

Various computer and roleplaying games also play a part in Pendragon canon, notably the Starfleet Academy and Star Trek: Borg PC games, and the RPG materials produced by Last Unicorn Games and Decipher, Inc..

There are parts of Pendragon background that are drawn piecemeal from different sources. For example, Romulan culture is drawn primarily from Diane Duane's Rihannsu novels, but also from LUG's The Way of D'era sourcebook. When background for something in Pendragon is created using this "patchwork-quilt" method, often times elements of one source are ignored or altered in favor of preferable, more logical, weighty or "authoritative" elements from another source.

All these things make up Pendragon continuity, the definition of what fits and what does not within Star Trek: Pendragon. However, Pendragon continuity can be broken down into two separate divisions: the "mainstream universe" where canon Trek takes place, and the Pendragon timeline itself, where the primary action of the series is set.

Characters

Regular characters

Seasons 1-4

Commanding officer. Played by Pierce Brosnan.
First officer. Played by Mel Gibson.
Operations officer. Played by Kelly Rutherford.
Security chief. Played by Michael T. Weiss.
Helmsman. Played by Dirk Benedict.
Transporter chief. Played by Rick Schroder.
Chief engineer. Played by Matthew Broderick. (Season 1)
Chief medical officer. Played by Gillian Anderson. (Seasons 1-2)
Chief engineer. Played by Barry Van Dyke. (Seasons 2-4)
Chief medical officer. Played by Sasha Alexander. (Season 3-)
Ship's counselor. Played by Jill Hennessy. (Seasons 1-3)

Seasons 4-7

Commanding officer. Played by Pierce Brosnan.
First officer, later commanding officer. Played by Kelly Rutherford.
Operations officer. Played by Scott Bakula.
Intelligence officer. Played by James Denton.
Chief engineer. Played by Kyle Chandler
Security chief. Played by Sean Astin. (Seasons 4-6)
Chief medical officer. Played by Sasha Alexander.
Ship's counselor. Played by Tempestt Bledsoe.
Helmsman. Played by Rick Schroder. (Seasons 4-5)
Helmsman. Played by Jake Gyllenhaal. (Seasons 5-7)

Major recurring characters

Episodes

Season One

  • "True North"
  • "Restoration"
  • "Exile"
  • "The Distant Fire"
  • "Wounded Soldiers"
  • "Obsidian Shadow"
  • "Dark Helix"
  • "Sword of Damocles" (Part I)
  • "Sword of Damocles" (Part II)
  • "The Parliament of Fear"
  • "L'Morte d'Maquis"
  • "Hidden Agendas"
  • "Practice in Waking"
  • "Heritage"
  • "The Forgeman"
  • "Children of the Burning Heart"
  • "In Darkness Find Me..."
  • "Twilight's Call"

Season Two

  • "Still Comes the Dawn"
  • "Approaching Emmaus"
  • "Survival Imperative"
  • "Prodigal Realities"
  • "Ceremonies of Innocence"
  • "Wings As Eagles"
  • "The Long Way Home"
  • "Wanderers, Seekers, Warriors, Thinkers"
  • "Where the Silence Breaks"
  • "Father to the Man"
  • "Sanctuary"
  • "Midnight Clear"
  • "To Follow a Sinking Star"

Season Three

  • "Destiny's Forge"
  • "Shadows of the Fire"
  • "Broken Sword"
  • "The Ill-Made Captain"
  • "The Martyr's Diplomacy"
  • "A Quiet Darkness"
  • "Cloak and Dagger"
  • "The Captain's Table: Bearers of the Light"
  • "Pilgrims On the Path of Shadows"
  • "Salvation, Part I"
  • "Salvation, Part II"
  • "Memoriam"
  • "The Long Night of Ben Riniker"
  • "Tales from an Uncertain Hour"
  • "Thy Fearful Symmetry"
  • "In the Realm of Shadow and Silence"
  • "Hidden Valleys"
  • "Red Sky"

Season Four

  • "Tempest Rising"
  • "The Princess and the Transporter Chief"
  • "The Ouroboros Syndrome"
  • "Vendetta Road"
  • "Reflections"
  • "That Solemn Starlight"
  • "Diluvium"
  • "Strangers In Purgatory"
  • "Avalon" (Part I)
  • "Avalon" (Part II)
  • "Tabula Rasa"
  • "Lighthouse In a Sea of Stars"
  • "Distant Whispers"
  • "More to This Life"
  • "Scandalon"
  • "Stalking the Night"
  • "Broken Destiny"
  • "The Dying of the Light"

Season Five

  • "Not Home Yet"
  • "Ties of Bitter Blood"
  • "Air and Darkness"
  • "No Rusty Swords"
  • Whispers As Loud As Thunder"
  • "Of Shadows and Starlight"
  • "Dreams May Come"
  • "Charade"
  • "Honor of the Sword"
  • "The View from the Gallery"
  • "Spirit of '76, Part I"
  • "Spirit of '76, Part II"
  • "First Knight"
  • "The Acolytes"
  • "Oubliette"
  • "Counterpoint, Part I"
  • "Counterpoint, Part II"
  • "Fidelis"
  • "Missing Person"
  • "The Prisoner of Vega"
  • "Angels with Broken Wings"
  • "To Face the Gathering Storm"

Season Six

  • "As Darker Grows the Night"
  • "The Utopia Syndrome"
  • "The Good Fight"
  • "Dragon's Gambit"
  • "Sorrow's Wake"
  • "The Disciple"
  • "Sometimes It Comes In the Clouds"
  • "The Argonaut Syndrome"
  • "Fugue"
  • "The Once and Future King, Part I"
  • "The Once and Future King, Part II"
  • "The Veil"
  • "The Kraken"
  • "Ruling from the Tomb"
  • "An Hour of Wolves"
  • "Odyssey, Part I"
  • "Odyssey, Part II"
  • "The Nautilus Coil"
  • "The Last Days of Rain"
  • "An Evening In Gethsemane"
  • "Dragonslayer"
  • "The Way to Camlann"

Season Seven

  • "Camelot's Ashes"
  • "Land of My Sojourn"
  • "The Death of Idle Kings"
  • "Faith My Eyes"
  • "The Significance of a Single Day"
  • "The Captain's Table: Cloud of Witnesses"
  • "Applied Physics"
  • "Crosses & Crowns"
  • "Shadows, Part I"
  • "Shadows, Part II"
  • "Another Time, Another Place"
  • "Starkindler"
  • "The Light of Distant Shores"
  • "Still Called Today"
  • "Promised Land"
  • "Above the Wrecks of Time"
  • "The Hand of God"

Specials

  • A Stranger No More (season two companion novella)
  • Building Camelot (anthology)
    • "Past Watchful Dragons"
    • "Black Velvet"
    • "Patriot's Insurrection"
    • "The Last Time I Saw Bajor"
    • "Dark Paradigm"
    • "'Til We Have Built Camelot"
  • Other Knights (anthology, edited by T.L. Morgan)
  • Once and Future (anthology)
    • "The Fisher King"
    • "The Blessing In the Thorn"
    • "Hearts of Olden Glory"
    • "Lasting Virtue"
    • "Reign the Stars"
    • "The Dragon In Winter"

External links

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.